Takoradi Port Dredging Begins


Takoradi harbour
Dredging at the Takoradi Port, which has been on the drawing board for sometime now, will definitely begin in December this year.

The dredging, which forms part of the Takoradi Port expansion project, will pave way for the construction of the quay wall at the port.

The dredging would ensure single handling of cargo to reduce cost mostly associated with import and export of commodities.

Messrs Jan-de-Dul, a construction firm from Belgium, will undertake the dredging works.

The Director of the Takoradi Port, Capt. James Owusu Koranteng, disclosed this at a day’s sensitization programme organized by officials of the port for some fishermen at the port’s catchment area.

The aim of the programme was to educate the fishermen on the need to stay away from the restricted area that would be demarcated on the sea where the dredging will take place.

He indicated that works on the extension of the existing main break water had virtually been completed, adding that “we are about to start the dredging.’

The expansion of the breakwater would pave the way for other constructional works and improve significantly the turnaround time at the port.

Capt. Koranteng indicated that because the machines that would be used to dredge the sea were somehow dangerous, there was the need to caution fishermen.

‘The dredging works will start from December 10, this year to March 2015 followed by the construction of the quay wall which will end in 2016,’ he added.

He noted that the port has a cordial relationship with the New Takoradi community, particularly the fishermen.

Ignace Stops, Project Manager of Jan due Nul, who educated the participants about the dredging works, noted that the project would be completed as scheduled.

Expansion works on the Takoradi Port will include construction of oil services terminal, reclamation of land area of 53,000 hectares, dredging of an access channel and construction of a bulk terminal.

When completed, the project is expected to position the port to receive bigger vessels, improve the turnaround time and eliminate double handling of cargoes.

Upon completion, manganese, bauxite and other bulk cargo operations would be transferred to a new dedicated jetty.

The expansion would also free the existing manganese terminal for the increasing demand of other sectors, including oil and gas.

From Emmanuel Opoku, Takoradi

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