Educational fund necessary for quality education – Lecturer

Traditional areas have been advised to establish educational trust fund to improve the quality of education in the country.

A senior lecturer at the School of Business at the University of Cape Coast, Dr John Gatsi gave the advice at the launch of Torgbui Lablulu Educational Trust Fund at Adaklu –Waya in the Adaklu District of the Volta Region

Dr John Gatsi underscored that setting up an educational trust fund in order to secure the future of children will have a positive inter-generational effect on the state.

He said the educational trust fund provides opportunity for many citizens of Waya and the region as a whole to contribute to the future of children in the area.

Citizens in Adaklu needs leaders who are deep thinkers, selfless and believe in mass comprehensive development, he said

According to him, Adaklu district has been declared as one of the poorest districts in Ghana. This, he said, is evident in the poor road network, low quality of life and abysmal performance at the basic education level.

However, these problems can be overcome through effective collaboration among all stakeholders in the fight against poverty, he observed.

“Our traditional leaders, DCE’s, MP’s in the region must conform to the new desire to have development oriented leaders and they must work harder to than ever. We want DCEs who are innovative and can help bring development at a faster pace; he said

H e commended the traditional leaders for establishing the fund and also advised students to work harder to achieve their goals

The Adaklu District Chief Executive Mr Sky Ganaku urged the traditional area to adopt the Adaklu-Waya Educational Trust Fund.

He said the assembly is ready to assist the fund to ensure that its objectives are achieved.

Mr Kwame Agbodza, Member of Parliament for Adaklu, said education remains the topmost priority for the District and was grateful to the traditional leaders for their foresight.

Togbe Lablulu Tegbeza V said the Fund was established in response to how a good number of brilliant students in the area struggle to meet needs such as school fees and other basic necessities to remain in school. Many of them drop out of school, he recounted.

“It is interesting, if not sad, to note that while other communities abound in countless professionals, we in Waya have just a handful…The point I want to put across is that I am yearning for a literate community with all the professionals,” he stated.

He commended teachers in the area for their hard work and urged them to help address poor reading culture in the schools.

Illiteracy rate in Adaklu is said to be still high though formal education got to the area in 1856.


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